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Miss Rodeo Nebraska Association Announces Pageant Contestants

Contestants have been announced for the Miss Rodeo Nebraska Pageant, June 11-14 in North Platte. Those vying for the title of Miss Rodeo Nebraska are:

 

 

Carly Woerman

 

Carly Woerman, 21, is a native of North Bend. She graduated from North Bend Central High School in 2013 and is currently finishing her last semester at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln where she is studying veterinary medicine.

 

“My lifelong passion has always been for animals, especially pets and small animals,” said Woerman. “I plan to pursue business classes this fall and apply for veterinary school. After obtaining my Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine, I plan to open my own practice in rural Nebraska.”

 

When not studying, Woerman can be found working on her father’s farm, airboating and playing sand volleyball. She also enjoys designing her rodeo queen wardrobe, swing dancing, spending time with her dog and horse and barrel racing.

 

Woerman is the daughter of Loy Woerman and Diane Gehring.

 

 

Allyn Leick

 

Allyn Leick, 25, graduated from Broken Bow High School in 2010. She is currently attending the University of Nebraska at Kearney, majoring in human biology. Her goal is to become either a doctor or a physician’s assistant.

 

“In either position, I will be able to help the people around me by working with them to improve their health, and thereby, their quality of life,” said Leick. “I am aware that the health field is extremely competitive, so in the event I am unable to pursue the graduate level courses necessary for doctors and physician assistants, I would like to either open or work in a business that serves customers in a positive, humanitarian capacity.”

 

Although she stays busy with work and school, Leick also has a lot of hobbies. Those including spending time with her pets, volunteering at the Kearney Area Animal Shelter, playing the violin, attending music performances, painting and reading poetry at open mic events.

 

Leick is the daughter of Joseph and Maxine Leick, of Mason City.

 

 

Kristin Kohmetscher

 

Kristin Kohmetscher, 24, is from Lawrence. She graduated from Blue Hill High School in 2010 and is currently attending the Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

 

“I am blessed to be able to pursue my childhood dream of becoming a veterinarian,” said Kohmetscher. “While in school, I have acquired an interest in acupuncture and chiropractic techniques and plan to become certified. I believe there is a future for acupuncture and chiropractic services for rodeo animals. My goal is to help in the development of that.”

 

Many of her extracurricular activities lend themselves to her field of study. She is an officer for the student chapters of both the American Association of Equine Practitioners and the American Association of Bovine Practitioners.

 

Kohmetscher also enjoys playing intramural sports, volunteering for her county fair, riding horses, giving riding lessons, roping, spending time on her family’s ranch, reading, drawing and anything musical. Her parents are Duane and (the late) Laurie Kohmetscher of Lawrence.

 

 

Riyatta Frye

 

Riyatta Frye, 22, lives in Harrisburg. She graduated from Northern Wyoming Community College in Gillette, Wyo., where she received a certificate in diesel mechanics. She has additional certificates in artificial insemination, bovine pregnancy testing and horseshoeing.

 

“In the fall of 2015, I had the amazing opportunity to travel to Arizona and intern with Al Dunning,” said Frye. “I would like to use the experience I gained there to train and show cutting horses. I would also like to get my EMT license and finish getting my CNA license.”

 

In her free time, Frye enjoys working cattle on her family’s ranch, attending brandings, riding and training colts, traveling to new places, singing the National Anthem for rodeos and other events and spending time with family and friends.

 

Frye is the daughter of Greg and Jenna Frye, of Ashby.

 

 

Miss Teen Rodeo Nebraska

 

There is also a teen division to the pageant. The contestants competing for the Miss Teen Rodeo Nebraska crown are:

 

 

Halee Kohmetscher

 

Halee Kohmetscher, 17, is from Lawrence. She will graduate from Blue Hill Community School next year and has plans to become a veterinary technician.

 

“Growing up on a farm has created within me a deep passion for agriculture,” Kohmetscher said. “My goal is to work in a rural area of Nebraska and interact with the people of the community to provide healthy and long lives for their animals.”

 

Kohmetscher’s hobbies include participating in 4-H, FFA and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, cooking, sewing, photography, artwork and music. She competes in volleyball, basketball and track.

 

Kohmetscher is also a band majorette, an FBLA officer, a Big Brothers Big Sisters of America volunteer and captain of her school’s dance team. In the summer months, she works on her family ranch and is a lifeguard.

 

Kohmetscher is the daughter of Duane and (the late) Laurie Kohmetscher of Lawrence.

 

 

Danielle Forster

 

Danielle Forster, 17, is from Smithfield. She is a junior at Elwood Public Schools. After graduation, she plans to attend the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and would like to eventually study at Iowa State University on her way to a career in equine veterinary medicine.

 

“My life mission is to complete my education and open my own veterinary practice,” said Forster. “I want to help save as many animal lives as possible and enjoy the work that I do every day of my life.”

 

Forster is involved in numerous school activities, including volleyball, basketball, FCCLA, dinner theater, choir, speech, FFA, National Honor Society and Women in Science.

 

Outside of school, she enjoys competing in 4-H and open horse shows, hunting, trail riding, reading, attending rodeos and helping with her family’s rodeo stock contracting business.

 

Her parents are Kevin and Kim Forster of Smithfield.

 

 

Molly Paxton

 

Molly Paxton, 15, is from Tryon. She currently attends Mullen High School, and after graduation, plans to join the U.S. Navy and eventually go into the medical field.

 

“I hope to further medical research and contribute to cutting-edge treatments that can help expand and enhance life for people suffering with illnesses, or find solutions to the mystery of unexpected death,” said Paxton.

 

Until then, she is an active member of her school’s FCCLA chapter. She competes in volleyball, basketball, track, rodeo and speech and is a member of both the All ‘A’ Honor Club and the High Ability Learner’s club.

 

Paxton is also the president of the Country Clover 4-H Club, serves as a junior leader for horse 4-H and plays several instruments, including the guitar, piano, flute, alto saxophone and banjo. One of her favorite pastimes is singing in talent shows.

 

Her parents are Dusty and Mindy Paxton, of Tryon.

 

 

Rebel Sjeklocha

 

Rebel Sjeklocha, 16, is from Hayes Center. She attends Maywood High School, and after graduation, plans to pursue a law degree.

 

“Because my roots run deep in rural America, my plan is to complete law school and then open a law practice in a small community,” said Sjeklocha. “In addition to being a great place to raise my own children, this would make it possible for me to invest in a rural area by giving back to and supporting my neighbors and community efforts”

 

In high school, Sjeklocha is a member of the volleyball, basketball, track, quiz bowl and mock trial teams as well as the National Honor Society. She competes in chorus, one act and speech competitions and participates in FFA.

 

Additionally, Sjeklocha has been a 4-H member for eight years, showing horses and beef cattle and competing in photography.

 

Her parents are Rusty and Susan Sjeklocha, of Hayes Center.

Free Youth ATV Training to Be Offered

The Business and Community Education department at Mid-Plains Community College will take its Free Youth ATV Training to the Cherry County Fairgrounds in Valentine on April 22.

 

There will be additional trainings in Broken Bow, Ogallala, Thedford, Benkelman, McCook and Imperial.

 

“The need for quality rider safety training is becoming more of a necessity every year as we continue to see serious injuries attributed to ATVs,” said Crystal Welch, Business and Community Education coordinator. “We are happy to offer this very important training to our area youth.”

 

There will be two sessions to choose from at each training: 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m. Classes will be divided by age group, 6-9 and 10-16. Six students from each age group will be allowed in each session.

 

The curriculum, developed by Central States Safety Driver Training, will consist of a combination of safety instruction and guided, hands-on ATV operation. Participants will practice turns, stops and terrain navigation.

 

Instruction topics will include ATV injury and fatality statistics, how ATV size can contribute to rollover injuries and fatalities, the dangers of carrying passengers and material on ATVs, risks of traveling on public roads and safety procedures and practices.

 

Those who complete the program successfully will receive a certificate that aligns with insurance company requirements.

 

ATVs in different sizes will be used during the trainings. Parents of children younger than 10 must stay for their child’s class.

 

Other requirements include:

§Closed-toe footwear (preferably over the ankle)

§Long, non-flare pants

§A long-sleeved shirt or jacket

§Approved eye protection (will be provided if a participant does not have any)

§A helmet (will be provided if a participant doesn’t have one)

 

Those unable to attend the training in Valentine will have the option of taking it at the following times and locations:

 

§April 29 - Custer County Fairgrounds, Broken Bow

§May 20 - Nebraska Department of Roads, Ogallala

§May 23 – Thomas County Fairgrounds, Thedford

§June 14 – Dundy County Fairgrounds, Benkelman

§June 15 - Red Willow County Fairgrounds, McCook

§June 21 - Chase County Fairgrounds, Imperial

 

Space is limited in all classes. Pre-registration is required by calling (308) 535-3678.

 

The trainings are possible thanks to a grant from the CHS Foundation, of Inver Grove Heights, Minn. The money is administered through the North Platte Community College Foundation.

Citta Deli wins Ben Hormel Business Plan Competition

Citta Deli and six other area businesses were named cash award winners Thursday in the Ben Hormel Business Plan Competition through McCook Community College’s Business and Community Education.

 

Citta Deli received $15,000 and Farkleberry’s of Hayes Center was named runner-up and received $7,500.

Five area businesses were awarded $1,5000 each including:

KB Home Care, McCook

Lamp Post Coffee and Boutique, Benkelman

Myrtle Health LLC, Imperial

On the Spot Services, McCook

Tornado Alley, Arapahoe

 

Prize money can be used to develop business ideas or expand on current business with no strings attached.

These seven finalists presented their business plan Thursday. They were among the 23 entries in this year’s competition representing nine different communities in the area. Of those, 15 were selected as semi-finalists and received scholarships to take the on-line Entrepreneurship Business Plan writing class offered through Mid-Plains Community College earlier this semester.

This year’s competition was open to new business development in Chase, Dundy, Hitchcock, Hayes, Frontier, Red Willow, and Furnas Counties. Anyone with a business idea or a plan to expand a current business was eligible to apply.

 

Local sponsors allow the college to keep the program going every other year, for at least the next five years. Gold sponsors include Community Hospital, MNB Financial Group, McCook College Foundation and McCook Community Foundation.

McCook Economic Development Corporation is a silver sponsor. Bronze sponsors are AmFirst Bank, First Central Bank, Adams Band and Trust – Imperial. Media sponsors include: McCook Daily Gazette, and Hometown Family Radio.

 

The Hormel Family Foundation was founded in 1999 by the late Ben F. Hormel to support MCC. Among his entrepreneurial ventures, Hormel operated the Chevrolet dealership in McCook. When he died in 2002, he passed on the torch to his children and grandchildren, who operate the foundation today. The main objective of the competition is to stimulate entrepreneurship and support business expansion in Southwest Nebraska.

 

Community Hospital Hosting Two-Day Wellness Fair

Community Hospital Hosting Two-Day Wellness Fair April 12 and 13
McCook, Nebraska—The public is invited to a two-day wellness fair hosted by Community Hospital, Wednesday and Thursday, April 12 and 13 from 7-9 a.m. each day in Community Hospital’s Prairie View meeting rooms at 1301 East H Street in McCook. The health fair will highlight Community Hospital’s services, offer continental breakfast, and a variety of health screenings at a free or reduced rate.
 
Blood Tests (Provided by McCook Clinic, PC): 
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Profile plus Lipid Profile—$35. Fasting is required for this test (no food or drink other than water) 12 hours prior. This test gives 22 results including cholesterol (LDL and HDL), electrolytes, blood sugar, liver health, kidney function and triglycerides (blood fats) and more.
  •  Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone—$25. Screens for thyroid gland problems.
  •  Prostate Specific Antigen for men—$20. Screens for prostate cancer.
  •  NEW! CBC or Complete Blood Count—$10. Measures the number of red and white blood cells and the total amount of hemoglobin in the blood.
  •  NEW! HGBA1C—$20. Also known as A1C, this test is a marker for average blood glucose levels
over the previous three months.
 
Payment will be accepted at the door for the blood draws. Checks should be written to McCook Clinic, PC. BC/BS insurance billing is available. Please bring your insurance ID card. Registration is not necessary. Test results will be mailed along with a brochure explaining the tests to the participant. Participants should make an appointment with their physician to review the results. For ease in registration, attendees may go to Community Hospital’s website at www.chmccook.org, click on the health fair link on the home page, print and fill out the Health Screen and Blood Draw Consent Form and bring it the day of the fair.
 
Community Hospital Screenings and Information include:
Screenings:
  • Speech—Hearing screenings & Info
  • Eat Smart - Get Fit Program—Prediabetes Screenings and questionnaires
 
Booths:
  •  Respiratory—Home Sleep Studies, Asthma, Smoking Cessation
  •  Nursing—Stroke Prevention, Mission Lifeline, Heart Attacks, Stroke Signs and Symptoms
  •  Health Foundation—Estate Planning
  •  Cancer Services—Local Cancer Treatments including Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy
  •  McCook Clinic—Expanded Walk-in Clinic, Medicare Wellness Visits, Chronic Care Coordination, Follow My Health Portal
  •  Community HealthCare & Hospice—Home Health and Hospice information
  •  Wellness for Life—Wellness Information
 
For questions, call Sarah Wolford, Community Hospital Community Outreach Coordinator at 308-344-8550.

Rabies Continues in Southwest Nebraska

Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department (SWNPHD) has confirmed the second positive rabies

case in our health district for the year. “We are an area of elevated concern for rabies in Nebraska,”
states Melissa Propp, RN, Surveillance Coordinator at SWNPHD. “Southwest Nebraska had the first
positive rabies case for 2017 and has had numerous reported cases since 2015.”

 

This case of rabies involves another skunk and is located in Chase County. “Rabies is a deadly virus
infection that affects the nervous system of humans and other mammals,” explains Propp. People
get rabies from the bite of an animal with rabies. Any wild mammal, like a raccoon, skunk, fox, coyote,
or bat, can have rabies and transmit it to people. Contact your local veterinarian and public health
department in regards to rabies testing and exposures.

 

According to the Center for Disease Control, rabies is a medical emergency. Any wounds should be
immediately washed with soap and water. They should also receive medical attention from a health
care professional.

 

“Vaccination is the best protection for keeping your pets safe,” states Propp. “We recommend that
residents contact their local veterinarian to make sure your pet’s vaccinations are current. In addition,
please be careful around stray or strange animals. If an animal bites you, and it is safe to do so, catch
the animal and contact your veterinarian for testing. It may save you the pain and cost of rabies
vaccinations.”

 

Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department serves Chase, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Hayes,
Hitchcock, Keith, Perkins and Red Willow counties. For more information call Melissa Propp, RN at
308-345- 4223 or email nurse@swhealth.ne.gov . SWNPHD is located at 404 West 10 th Street,
McCook – one block north of Arby’s and 501 Broadway, Imperial – entrance on 5 th Street. You can
also follow SWNPHD on Facebook.com/swnphd and Twitter@swpublichealth.

“Folk Songs and Fiddle Tunes”

Join “Simply Strings” for an afternoon of delightful fiddle tunes and folk music sure to lift your spirits! The concert will
include violin soloists Leanne Miller and Elizabeth Knedlik, as well as a double quartet, a student ensemble and a trio of
harpists!
Elizabeth Knedlik and Charles Coleman will co-direct the concert, which begins at 2:00 pm, Sunday April 2nd, at McCook’s
Fox Theatre. A freewill offering is the cost of admission.
Music included in the performance will include renditions of upbeat fiddle tunes, as well as familiar folk songs and old
favorites. An arrangement of “You Raise Me Up” will also be shared as a memorial tribute to Maribeth
Augustyn. Maribeth was a faithful member of this fledging orchestra, as well as a violin teacher and beloved friend to
many of its members.
“Simply Strings” provides an opportunity for young people to join with more experienced strings players to hone their
skills and enjoy an orchestral experience. We are certain you will enjoy the result!

MPCC Campus Will Host a Registration Day

Mid-Plains Community College will offer and in-depth look at its programs and services during a series of Registration Days starting in April.

 

Every MPCC campus will host a Registration Day, giving prospective students from throughout the college’s 18-county service area an opportunity to sign up for classes and receive the information needed to begin coursework in the fall.

 

The events are more than just registering for classes, however. They also serve as foundations - designed to keep prospective students on track and ensure they have a successful and rewarding experience at MPCC through graduation.

 

“Our mission with these events is to connect with students early in the process and make a plan for their success,” said Kelly Rippen, area dean of enrollment management. “We want to partner with them to help make the best decisions on how to pay for college and what major to choose, as well as what schedule fits their needs. It is so important for them to see how many services are available and how many people are in their corner.”

 

Students will be able to take placement tests, if needed, and campus tours will be available. Representatives will be on hand to answer any questions about:

 

§Class scheduling

§Financial aid

§Setting up a payment plan

§Bookstores

§Career services

§Advising

§Library services

§Student Success/tutors

§Disability services

§Student life

§Student organizations

§Campus housing

Those interested in attending a Registration Day are asked to RSVP at least a week ahead of time at https://campus.mpcc.edu/ICS/First_Time_Student/. The first 75 to sign up will receive a free hoodie.

Although not mandatory, parents are also encouraged to be part of Registration Days. There will be a session designed specifically for them.

 

The Registration Days will be:

§McCook Community College – 10 a.m. on April 13, May 25, June 15, July 13 and Aug. 3

§North Platte Community College – 10 a.m. on April 11, May 23, June 13, July 11 and Aug. 1

§Broken Bow Campus – 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. on March 30

§Imperial Campus – 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. – on April 10

§Ogallala Campus – 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. on April 4

§Valentine Campus – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 20

Campylobacter Investigation in Furnas County

Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department (SWNPHD), Center for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC), and Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS) are
involved in an investigation of gastrointestinal illnesses, specifically Campylobacter, among
residents in and around the Beaver City community.
“We were impressed with the willingness of medical facilities, Beaver City and Furnas County
employees to work with all these entities during this investigation,” explains Myra Stoney,
SWNPHD Director. “We are very appreciative of people who have completed surveys and
would still encourage others to complete the survey found at Facebook.com/swnphd. If you
work, shop or eat in Beaver City, we are asking each person in your household to complete the
survey, even if you were not ill.”
According to CDC, Campylobacter is one of the most common causes of diarrheal illness in
the United States. Some specific information:
 Campylobacteriosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria.
 Most people who become ill with this get diarrhea, cramping, abdominal pain and fever
within two to five days after exposure to the organism. It may include nausea and
vomiting.
 The illness typically lasts one week.
 Some infected persons do not have any symptoms.
 Most cases are associated with eating raw or undercooked poultry meat or cross-
contamination of other foods by these items. Unpasteurized dairy products,
contaminated water, poultry and produce are the top areas of concern.
 It takes fewer than 500 organisms to make a person sick. Even one drop of juice from
raw chicken meat can have enough Campylobacter in it to infect a person.
 One way to become infected is to cut poultry meat on a cutting board, and then use the
unwashed cutting board or utensil to prepare vegetables or other raw or lightly cooked
foods.
 Animals can also be infected and some people get infected from contact with the stool
of the animal.
 Surface water and mountain streams can become contaminated with infected animal
feces.
“The investigation process is very challenging,” shares SWNPHD Surveillance Coordinator,
Melissa Propp, RN. “We appreciate the patience exhibited by so many in answering numerous
questions.”
Some simple food handling practices can help prevent Campylobacter infections:
Wash hands with soap before preparing food.
Cook all poultry products thoroughly. Make sure that the meat is cooked throughout
and any juices run clear. All poultry should be cooked to reach a minimum internal
temperature of 165 degrees.
Wash hands with soap after handling raw foods of animal origin and before touching
anything else.
Prevent cross-contamination in the kitchen by using separate cutting boards for foods of
animal origin and other foods.
Thoroughly clean all cutting boards, countertops and utensils with soap and hot water
after preparing raw food of animal origin.
Do not drink raw milk, unpasteurized milk or untreated surface water.
Make sure that persons with diarrhea, especially children, wash their hands carefully
and frequently with soap to reduce the risk of spreading the infection.
Wash hands with soap after contact with pet feces.
Dr. Anna Carlson (NDHHS Office of Epidemiology) has worked closely with the staff at
SWNPHD throughout the investigation. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact
her at 402-471- 7021 or anna.carlson@nebraska.gov.
Additional questions are directed to SWNPHD staff at 404 West 10 th Street (block north of
Arby’s) in McCook or 501 Broadway (Moreland Building 5 th Street entrance) in Imperial. Our
website is www.swhealth.ne.gov. For more information call 308-345-4223 in McCook or 308-
882-4269 in Imperial. You can follow us on Facebook.com/swnphd and
Twitter@swpublichealth.
Southwest Nebraska Public Health serves Chase, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Hayes, Hitchcock,
Keith, Perkins and Red Willow counties.

Free Youth ATV Training begins April 8

Free Youth ATV Training begins April 8

The Business and Community Education department at Mid-Plains Community College will expand its Free Youth ATV Training this spring by adding classes in Thedford and Benkelman.

 

Trainings will continue to be offered in the traditional locations of North Platte, McCook, Imperial, Ogallala, Broken Bow and Valentine as well.

 

“The need for quality rider safety training is becoming more of a necessity every year as we continue to see serious injuries attributed to ATVs,” said Crystal Welch, Business and Community Education coordinator. “We are happy to be offering this very important training to our area youth.”

The first training is scheduled for April 8 at the North Platte Community College North Campus. There will be two sessions to choose from: 9 a.m. to noon and 1-4 p.m.

 

Classes will be divided by age group, 6-9 and 10-16. Six students from each age group will be allowed in each session.

 

The curriculum, developed by Central States Safety Driver Training, will consist of a combination of safety instruction and guided, hands-on ATV operation. Participants will practice turns, stops and terrain navigation.

 

Instruction topics will include ATV injury and fatality statistics, how ATV size can contribute to rollover injuries and fatalities, the dangers of carrying passengers and material on ATVs, risks of traveling on public roads and safety procedures and practices.

 

Those who complete the program successfully will receive a certificate that aligns with insurance company requirements.

 

ATVs in different sizes will be used during the trainings. Parents of children younger than 10 must stay for their child’s class.

 

Other requirements include:

*Closed-toe footwear (preferably over the ankle)

*Long, non-flare pants

*A long-sleeved shirt or jacket

*Approved eye protection (will be provided if a participant does not have any)

*A helmet (will be provided if a participant doesn’t have one)

 

Those unable to attend the training in North Platte will have the option of taking it at any of the following times and locations:

*April 22 - Cherry County Fairgrounds, Valentine

*April 29 - Custer County Fairgrounds, Broken Bow

*May 20 - Nebraska Department of Roads, Ogallala

*May 23 – Thomas County Fairgrounds, Thedford

*June 14 – Dundy County Fairgrounds, Benkelman

*June 15 - Red Willow County Fairgrounds, McCook

*June 21 - Chase County Fairgrounds, Imperial

 

Space is limited in all classes. Pre-registration is required by calling (308) 535-3678.

The trainings are possible thanks to a grant from the CHS Foundation, of Inver Grove Heights, Minn. The money is administered through the NPCC Foundation.

The McCook Community Foundation Fund Grant Meeting

The McCook Community Foundation Fund is always looking for new and innovative ideas to help fund
through MCFF’s community grants. And the next grant deadline is quickly approaching, with grant
applications for the 2017 spring grants due by 5 p.m. on Saturday, April 1.
To help with the grant process, MCFF is hosting a Grant Application Informational Meeting on
Wednesday, March 15 in the third-floor training room at the Keystone Business Center. The meeting will
begin at 11:45 a.m. with lunch provided by MCFF. Topics will include information from previous grant
recipients, an overview of MCFF’s mission and vision and the grant process. The meeting will conclude
with questions from participants.
If you would like to attend the Grant Application Informational Meeting, please RSVP by Monday, March
13 at 5 p.m., call 344-9363, text 340-3412, or email, mcffund@gmail.com.
More than $30,000 will be available for public charities, government entities or other community groups
performing charitable activities for MCFF’s Spring 2017 grant cycle.
Projects will receive priority if they have a broad impact on the quality of life for a significant number of
people; propose creative ways to address community needs; engage young people in the community, or
support innovative approaches to economic and community development.
The MCFF grant application form can be found at nebcommfound.org/fund/mccook or by emailing
mcffund@gmail.com to have a form sent to you.

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